Classic Book Club

“Classic” books are classic for a reason – their literary excellence transcends passing fads, and they continue to engage readers generation after generation. If there are classics you have always meant to read “someday,” or if you read them in school before you were ready to appreciate them, now is the time to enjoy them with other adult readers.

Discussion groups will meet at 7:00 p.m. on the second Tuesday of every other month. Anyone is welcome to attend any session, but advanced registration is required if you would like the library to reserve you a book. Register here!

In 2018, we are exploring “classically funny” titles. So if your memory of classic literature is all doom and gloom, this may be the perfect year to join us for a look at the lighter side.

 

Next Meeting: April 10, 2018

A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole

Many words could be applied to this novel: astonishing, extravagant, lunatic, satiric, and peculiar, but it is above all genuine, skillful, and unsentimentally comic. It is the story of a 30-year-old boy, monstrously fat, his drunken mama, and their unutterably awful life in New Orleans. You might say that despite their bumbling everything turns out for the best, except that in the world of Mr. Toole, which is eerily akin somehow to that of Flannery O’Connor and Nikolai Gogol, there is no “best.” (Booklist)

Discussion Questions:

  1. The first chapter of A Confederacy of Dunces is generally thought to be among the funniest in American literature. Do you agree?  What other comic novels remind you of A Confederacy of Dunces and why?
  2. Ignatius constantly criticizes and deprecates his mother while relying on her to keep his life together. Does she feel the same way about her son?  What does she need from him and what does she get for her pains?
  3. The city of New Orleans plays a central role in the novel, seeming to be a character in and of itself. Could this novel have been set in another American city?  Elaborate.

Questions excerpted from Litlovers

 

 

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